Dr. Jack Tips – Cancer Clues in our Mitochondria

Dr. Jack Tips – Cancer Clues in our Mitochondria

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Dr. Jack Tips

Speaking at Live it to Lead it
March 29-31, 2019
Nashville, Tennessee

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Dr. Jack Tips
Natural Health Consultant,
WellnessWiz

Jack Tips earned a Ph.D. in Nutrition Science from the Dr. Roger Williams School of Nutrition Science, Clayton, Missouri (dissertation: Conquer Candida and Restore Your Immune System). He is the author of 16 books including the classic, “The Pro-Vita! Plan For Optimal Nutrition,” He is a board-certified Naturopathic Physician with the American Naturopathic Medical Certification & Accreditation Board, and is registered to practice clinical nutrition in New York. He is a member of the advisory board of the International & American Associations of Clinical Nutritionists. In 1984, he began a clinical practice based on a three-tiered approach to health: classical homeopathy to stimulate vitality, systemic herbology to support specific tissue functions, and clinical nutrition for metabolic balance. He also lectures at a variety of naturopathic and chiropractic colleges around the world on nutrition, the intestinal microbiome, herbology, and homeopathy.

TRANSCRIPT

Dr. Pompa:  
Well, I’m here with Jack Tips. Jack, I just got done telling Ashley that I’ve known you for over 20 years. Man, can you believe it’s been that long, already?

Jack Tips:  
You know, it’s happening and for me at my time of life, it’s 40 years. But I tell you, we do keep accumulating knowledge and maybe even a little wisdom along the way.

Dr. Pompa:
Well, look man, that 20 years ago, over 20 years ago, I was sick and someone said, “Hey, you need to see Dr. Jack Tips.” I sought you out at a seminar and pulled from your brain and you turned me on to systemic formulas and a lot of things that I’m sure I teach today. So you’re a wealth of knowledge, Jack Tips, and you and I have been running in the same fields for a long time. We have a lot of respect for each other. Thanks for being here.

Jack Tips:    
Oh, thank you so much. I’m very, very excited about what we are cooking up.

Dr. Pompa: 
Yeah. Well, you’re going to be at our next seminar and you haven’t been for a while. And this one we had to have you because of the topic. We have a focus on this one, of course, all the cellular healing and cellular detox but we have a focus on cancer. And you have something you share with us on this webinar, but you’re going to share a great detail at the seminar. And folks watching, I have to say this because many people … this is the first time we’ve actually opened up a whole day to the public because of the topic thought it necessary that you hear this information. So Jack-

Jack Tips:    
Absolutely.

Dr. Pompa:   
Yeah. I mean, so we couldn’t just leave it to doctors. I felt like it had to go beyond and I think people are educating themselves on this topic more than ever. And I feel like modern medicine is holding back but we’re not going to hold back. But Jack, you’re a guy like me, man, you just dig into a top and crush it and kill it. This is one you have done. So tell us a little bit about what you’re going to be teaching on and some new discovery that you came across about cancer.

Jack Tips:  
Oh certainly. The first thing that stares us all in the face now is that the statistics about your, my, and all of our friends likelihood of coming down with cancer, one of the most horrible things that happens to people, for many people it’s a death sentence. It’s a change of life that now the statistics are one out of two for men. 1 out of 2.4 women but statistics keep getting worse.

Dr. Pompa:  
Yeah.

Jack Tips: 
Because Daniel, when we talked 10 years ago, it was one out of three.

Dr. Pompa:      
I know.

Jack Tips:   
And so there’s something wrong. There’s something going wrong with trillions of dollars and 50 years of medical research and we’re coming up and we have to admit at this point we’re losing. And we don’t deserve to be losing because we’ve got to have the same advantages that our ancestors had and 200 years ago, this was not the issue

Dr. Pompa: 
Right. Yeah, no doubt about it. What is going wrong? I mean, it’s just remarkable that people are still buying into the treatments, right? But it’s obvious the treatments are losing but it’s fear tactics, right? I mean, I’m telling you, just I mean, just in the last few months we’ve had two people very close to us, friends of ours get cancer. Well, actually, three. I just thought of a third. And I could tell you right now, maybe one of the three things look good for even in the short term. Long term even when they call it a cure, Jack, I don’t buy into it because it shows up somewhere else as another cure. So with that said, … or as another cancer, I should say. With that said, Jack, where are we going wrong? What’s your opinion on that?

Jack Tips: 
Well, we’re looking at the premise wrong. And I had the opportunity last year to be a third speaker with Dr. Bruce Lipton and Ty Bollinger on an international symposium. So this is an area that I delved into, but I knew if I’m going to look at the same research, I can’t come out with the same faulty answer. And so I noticed something that was just absolutely astounding about the main character traits of cancer. One, they ferment sugars. Two, love a low oxygen environment. They love acidic pH. Four, they strive for immortality.

And so with some of those perspectives, lo and behold, those criterion match up with behaviors of ancient bacteria. Now when we understand that our mitochondria, our DNA in our body of mitochondria, the energy producers in ourselves are indeed foreign bacterial DNA, maybe we ought to be looking at the traits of bacteria. And then I found out that this is a survival technique. So instead of saying cancer’s trying to kill us, what if cancers trying to save us from something. What if the tumor is trying to save us coming from a 180-degree perspective, all of a sudden a tremendous insight started to develop that we can understand what is causing cancer, then we are empowered as individuals to do the things that prevent it.

Dr. Pompa:   
Well, that’s an interesting take. I mean, I would say even people in our world, the natural world, don’t have this perspective, right? So I mean, it’s been said that, you know, we all have cancer cells, we all have bad cells, right? And when the body goes out of homeostasis, we see, like you said, the mitochondria all of a sudden going through a process of glycolysis in the presence of oxygen which normally doesn’t happen. So you’re saying that it could be though that the body is literally trying to find balance in homeostasis and it’s creating this environment. Is that it? And then with the bacteria, how does that come in again? Explain that again. Because there was part of it that I caught and part not.

Jack Tips:     
So within the DNA of bacteria, there’s the same survival traits that human DNA has. We’re going to adapt, we’re going to survive, we’ve survived for hundreds of thousands of years.

Dr. Pompa:    
Right.

Jack Tips:
We’re survivors, while the bacteria have shown they can give us a run for the money. But what if deep in the code of let’s say mitochondrial DNA is the last-ditch effort, the deep savage movement to survive or die, and that by survival, now the bacteria convert, it’s called atavism, it converts back to the way it worked in the more primordial time when the Earth’s oceans were highly acidic, when there was very little oxygen in the air. How did these guys learn to multiply, and multiply, and multiply like cancer tumor

So the hypothesis that comes forth is could the tumor be gobbling up the sugar and actually preventing cancer from metastasis and moving on. What if the tumor is actually a stopgap? And so often the body stopgaps have collateral damage. They’re not the best thing to happen. They’re to be [inaudible 00:07:50] or a short-framed and abandoned.

Dr. Pompa: 
It’s like inflammation. Inflammation on the short is very good but inflammation that it ends up going chronic, you know, it’s a stopgap, and it can go crazy and be negative. Okay. So with that said then, what do we do, right? I mean, so this is a different view. I mean, does that open up different answers? How does that present as far as a solution goes?

Jack Tips:  
Well, when we look at this with in the bacterial characteristic model, then the question would be what’s rallying up the bacteria what’s pushing DNA in our bodies to epigenetically bring out an undesirable trait? And we know the mitochondria talked to our nuclear, our cellular DNA that they’ve all gotten in on the same team, but now we have team players that are going into atavistic survival. What’s push their button? What’s slamming them? Well, gee, what’s the natural-health model been talking about for 50 years? EMF damage to the mitochondrial DNA. What about heavy metal toxicity? What about the over-consumption of sugar? What about the lack of proper fat combustion by the mitochondria to make energy?

You see, so all of a sudden, this sets the framework for so much of the natural health model. And in my talk, we’re actually going to be able to run a checklist of our own lives and look at these as susceptibility factors, and then we can make decisions to remove that susceptibility and strengthen our immune system. But when we look at the even medical treatments today that are becoming successful or that addressed parts [inaudible 00:09:48], not only do we have things like the ketogenic diet, but we also have alteration of pH. We have autoimmune that we have immunotherapy that medicine is just now stepping into. So we don’t even have to step outside of the medical model to get something like immunotherapy that’s now starting to get results. But immunotherapy is not chemotherapy.

Dr. Pompa:  
Yeah, yeah. [crosstalk 00:10:15]. I know you’re going to discuss that more at the seminar. You know, I mean, you’re an expert in the microbiome as well. How does that pay in? Because we’re talking about the microbiome being a complex organism here, bacteria, viruses, fungi. How does that play into cancer, do you feel?

Jack Tips: 
Well, you know, all these bacteria talk to each other. There’s a lot network communication between the gut microbiome, the skin microbiome, and all the other microbiomes of the body. So we know and have learned that when we do certain things in the gut microbiome, it might impact the vaginal microbiome in a woman. And so there’s a strong compatibility. So now that we’ve learned in modern times that it’s time to stop the war on killing the bacteria when only 1% of all bacteria are pathogenic and we’re killing 100% with collateral damage, the war on bacteria now we can learn to nurture the good guys and then let them take care of business for us. So it very much ties into the microbiomes.

The thing that I think so much now that medicine has classified cancer as not only they’re moving toward it being a metabolic disease and that’s what we mean by mitochondria making energy. But also, [inaudible 00:11:49] mitochondrial bacteria have profound communications throughout the body. And so we’re really getting a point of leverage when we take care of the foreign DNA in our microbiome which is all the bacteria, we’re taking care of our own health as well.

Dr. Pompa:   
Yeah. I mean, your point is that the bacteria in our gut we’ve learned have such an unbelievable effect communication with our cells and our own bacteria, our own DNA epigenetically even. So talk a little bit about that. You’ve spent some time with Dr. Bruce Lipton who wrote the book Biology of Belief. And lot of respect for him especially for his membrane work and how that affects the epigenome. But we’re learning how these gut bacteria affect the epigenetics and can turn on or off good genes, bad genes, et cetera. Talk a little bit about that.

Jack Tips:  
Well, this process of epigenetics goes two ways. And so something can insult the body and turn on a more hyper-reactivity and something can then turn that off. And that’s really the beauty because in the older model of genetics where doctors were saying if you’ve got cancer genes so to speak, which is really a ludicrous concept. Why would the body have diseases? Why would the body have genes that cause diseases like something’s wrong? But no, those genes are literally stopgaps or the best the body can do under the circumstances. If we remove the cause, then the epigenetics can go back. So I want to say, this is a message of great hope that we understand now that the body has the mechanisms inherent to cure chronic degenerative and autoimmune diseases. It has the ability within itself.

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah. You know, I don’t even know how you feel on this. I mean, I don’t think I’ve ever discussed this with you. But right now, the whole SNP thing, homozygous, MTHFR. I mean, everyone’s defining themselves by these genes. I think I had a lot of hope at one point this would be something. But I think now, we realize the epigenetics trumps it. I mean, what’s your feeling on the SNPs, I mean, all the testing with the SNP.

Jack Tips: 
Sure it does but I think the quickest example might be that I’ve heard people say oh, the APOE4 SNP, if you’re homozygous, then it’s called the Alzheimers. Actually, that gene was to give more brain energy, was to move more fat for the brain to make energy because people had hookworm and were losing their energy. So there comes the APOE4 gene to mobilize the fats in the brain to make energy. So modern science tells us the brain is a hog for sugar. It’s really a hog for ketones and that’s going to be derived from fat.

And so the ancients had this mechanism, well, today, we don’t have the hookworm so much. But here we go, we’re looking at one SNP. And actually, Alzheimers is a constellation of at least science knows right now, six or seven SNPs. So everybody’s got SNPs because life wants biodiversity. We want [inaudible 00:15:35] person that present one way to the threats of the world and another another way. That’s why if you have a bubonic plague, you still have 10% of the people survive. You still have Aztecs that survived the onslaught of smallpox. And so nature is playing the field. Everyone has to have genes turned on and off.

And so the problem right now with this early gene work is that they’re looking at one thing. They’re looking at one MTHFR and then they’re putting let’s say Methyl B12 and Methylfolate in a shot, put it in butt but they haven’t look at the COMT genes, they haven’t looked at the CBS genes. And so there’s this whole gestalt that one person is not supposed to be methylating as efficiently as another. They have other systems. So we have a very immature look at this whole SNP thing right now.

Dr. Pompa:   
Yeah. You know, it’s amazing. We never talked about that and I just knew somehow you’d have the same outlook that I do there. It is, we know so little. I mean, 10 years from now, we’re going to be laughing at the fact that we thought that that was the one thing that was so important with methylation when there’s a zillion other pathways around that we don’t even see yet, right? So anyways, yeah, my dogs are barking so they’re happy to see somebody. But you know, Jack, you’re a wealth of knowledge, man. I mean, my doctors that will be there. They always say I could listen to Jack for hours and I agree with them. You’re always are well researched. I can’t wait to hear this topic [crosstalk 00:17:22].

Jack Tips:
You know, Dr. Pompa, it’s real important. My talk is what I call a meta-analysis. And so it’s going to be very interesting to the general public. And I think as the public gets a new perspective that what would be triggering bad behavior in bacterial DNA of which if every cell in our body other than red blood cells, every cell has 4,000, 6,000 of these mitochondria, we have a lot of this DNA that’s organized. And there’s deep science research right now going on about how this DNA could then trigger a survival mode. And you understand both because of your research and work in autophagy, but with the cellular communication, we get the bacteria rallied up. Now, epigenetically, the cells can start to resist what, apoptosis. That’s called the savage routs of immortality. We don’t want that cellular immortality of [inaudible 00:18:33] cells. And so those cells from ancient times learned how to avoid apoptosis.

Now, Dr. Bruce Lipton teaches well, how do we really get these cancers and he’ll go into what’s called exosomes. And it’s basically the way the body lowers its immune defense so a woman can become pregnant. The man gives foreign DNA, the man gives foreign protein and the woman’s body has to let the immune system look the other way so there can be fertilization of the egg and perpetuation of the species. Cancer is grabbing that ability in our bodies and it’s actually terraforming different tissues and preparing them for metastasis. So these cancers are developed over a long period of time. They’re using some of our basic mechanism as human beings.

So as they say, knowledge is power. And I think these [inaudible 00:19:41] well prove themselves out. But it’s really immaterial because all we have to ask ourselves is what’s insulting to our DNA? What’s insulting to our bodies? And then we can be going all day long about mercury in the mouth, we can go about glyphosate Round-UP, we can go about all of these things. Well, one or two the body can handle except for people with certain genetic profiles. But that’s why cancer may be started out in the old days as being 100th or a 1000th of a 1% might succumb, they had a flaw. But one out of two, I mean, how can we even be looking at each other wondering and point at each other which one if we’ll wait a few years. No, it’ll be neither of us because we both take preventative measures.

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, you know, I mean, the problem is is that the general public wants a pill or an x-ray, radiation, whatever it is. I mean, they want a cure whereas we understand it that there is no cure. I mean, when you understand what you’re saying, obviously, the body is in a defense mode. These cells are living too long, they’re surviving. We don’t cure things, we look to our life and say, “What do we have to change?” With that said, I know you’re going to be sharing some things that people need to do right away.

Jack Tips:   
Absolutely.

Dr. Pompa:  
And I think there’s hope. I think because we know more, there’s so much more hope today. But yet that none of it’s going to get funded because it’s not a drug company and the FDA is not going to be happy about it, as simple as that.

Jack Tips:     
Daniel, I’ll present on this but there’s an Italian doctor that injects baking soda into the tumor. He’s got a science behind it but he’s extremely effective. So we’re going to find little simple inexpensive things that can literally banish. And I know the name of your seminar here is how … it’s really how to banish these influences so that we can live healthy despite all the things in the environment.

Dr. Pompa:  
Right. [inaudible 00:22:00] bringing every truth and we have the experts around the world and we have the top cancer doctors, researchers, practitioners, I mean, all there. So this is it, you don’t want to miss this seminar. Friends or family worth a fly to the seminar. But you can get that information on this page, the dates, the location, the hotels all right here. Click and you’ll get every bit of that information. But Jack, thank you. Because, I mean, honestly, this is your wealth of knowledge. I appreciate everything that you always bring and I appreciate you being part of this mission which you have been for years even behind the scenes, people have no idea.

Jack Tips: 
No, thank you so much. I’m going to fly to the seminar myself and I’m going to bring a few bombshells for people, true empowerment, to make lasting changes. So I’m [crosstalk 00:22:51].

Dr. Pompa:  
You said that, I’ve got some bombshells, man. I can’t wait to unleash them like I’m excited. I do have one more question, though. Are you going to bring your guitar to Nashville?

Jack Tips:
Oh, dear, I hadn’t thought of that. I think those Nashville cats would laugh at me.

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, yeah, man. You know, a few little strums on stage just to get the crowd going with you. I think that would be wise, I think that would be good. You’d put them in a state of emotion.

Jack Tips:
All right. You don’t know how timid I am but I think I’ll have to reach out and we’ll see, we’ll see. Thank you.

Dr. Pompa:
All right. All right. I’ve seen you do it. All right, Jack, I love and appreciate you. I’ll see you at the seminar.

Jack Tips:         
You got it. Bye-bye.

Dr. Pompa:
See ya.

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